Teacher Collaboration References

Endnotes

Introduction

1 Dan C. Lortie, Schoolteacher: A Sociological Study (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1975).
2 Ibid.
3 Milbrey W. McLaughlin and Joan E. Talbert, Professional Communities and the Work of High School Teaching (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001): 95.
4 Ibid.
5 Michael Huberman, “The Model of the Independent Artisan in Teachers’ Professional Relations,” in Teachers Work: Individuals, Colleagues and Contexts, eds. Judith Warren Little and Milbrey Wallin McLaughlin (New York: Teacher’s College Press, 1993), 11–50.
6 Joan E. Talbert and Milbrey W. McLaughlin, “Professional Communities and the Artisan Model of Teaching,” Teachers and Teaching: Theory And Practice 8, no. 3 (2002): 325–43.
7 Susan Moore Johnson, "Will VAMs Reinforce the Walls of the Egg-Crate School?" Educational Researcher 44, no. 2 (2015): 119.
8 Jane Coggshall, Amber Ott, Ellen Behrstock and Molly Lasagna, Retaining Teacher Talent: The View from Generation Y (New York: Learning Point Associates and Public Agenda, 2010), 15, http://www.aft.org/pdfs/teachers/genyreport0411.pdf.
9 Susan J. Rosenholtz, Teachers' Workplace: The Social Organization of Schools (New York: Longman, 1989).
10 Johnson, “VAMs,” 2015.
11 Na’ilah Suad Nasir, Carlos Cabana, Barbara Shreve et al., eds., Mathematics for Equity: A Framework for Successful Practice (New York: Teachers College Press, 2014).

Section 1: Does teacher collaboration improve student learning?

12 Anthony S. Bryk, Penny Bender Sebring, Elaine Allensworth et al. Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010).
13 Katrien Vangrieken, Filip Dochy, Elisabeth Raes and Eva Kyndt, “Teacher Collaboration: A Systematic Review,” Educational Research Review 15 (2015): 36.
14 Matthew A. Kraft and John P. Papay, “Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience,” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 36, no. 4 (2014): 488, 494.
15 Matthew Ronfeldt, Susanna Owens Farmer, Kiel McQueen and Jason A. Grissom, "Teacher Collaboration in Instructional Teams and Student Achievement," American Educational Research Journal 52, no. 3 (2015): 475–514.
16 Ibid., 501.
17 Bryk et al., Organizing Schools for Improvement, 2010, 54–56.
18 Ibid., 113.
19 Ibid., 116–17.
20 Ibid., 117.
21 Yvonne L. Goddard, Roger D. Goddard and Megan Tschannen-Moran, “A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of Teacher Collaboration for School Improvement and Student Achievement in Public Elementary Schools,” Teachers College Record 109, no. 4 (2007): 877–96.
22 Matthew Ronfeldt, “Field Placement Schools and Instructional Effectiveness,” Journal of Teacher Education 66, no. 4 (2015): 312.
23 John Papay, Eric S. Taylor, John H. Tyler and Mary Laski, “Learning Job Skills from Colleagues at Work: Evidence from a Field Experiment Using Teacher Performance Data,” No. w21986 (Cambridge, Mass.: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2016), 22–25.
24 Steven Glazerman, Eric Isenberg, Sarah Dolphin et al., "Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Final Results from a Randomized Controlled Study,” NCEE 2010-4027 (Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2010), https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20104027/.
25 Vicki Vescio, Dorene Ross and Alyson Adams, “A Review of Research on the Impact of Professional Learning Communities on Teaching Practice and Student Learning,” Teaching and Teacher Education 24, no. 1 (2008): 87.
26 Ibid., 86.
27 Yvonne L. Goddard, Robert Miller, Ross Larson et al., “Connecting Principal Leadership, Teacher Collaboration, and Student Achievement,” paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Denver, CO, May 2010, 16, http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED528704.pdf.
28 Carrie R. Leana and Frits K. Pil, “A New Focus on Social Capital Reform Efforts,” Shanker Institute blog, October 14, 2014, http://www.shankerinstitute.org/blog/new-focus-social-capital-school-reform-efforts.
29 Carrie R. Leana and Frits K. Pil, "Social Capital and Organizational Performance: Evidence from Urban Public Schools," Organization Science 17, no. 3 (2006): 363.
30 Ibid.
31 Margaret E. Goertz, Leslie Nabors Olah and Matthew Riggan, “Can Interim Assessments Be Used for Instructional Change?” CPRE Policy Briefs (Philadelphia: Consortium for Policy Research in Education and University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, 2009), http://repository.upenn.edu/cpre_policybriefs/39.
32 Judith Warren Little, “Understanding Data Use Practice Among Teachers: The Contribution of Micro-Process Studies,” American Journal of Education 118, no. 2 (2011): 143–66.
33 Alan J. Daly, "Data, Dyads, and Dynamics: Exploring Data Use and Social Networks in Educational Improvement," Teachers College Record 114, no. 11 (2012): 15.
34 Mary Ann Lachat and Stephen Smith, “Practices That Support Data Use in Urban High Schools,” Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk 10, no. 3 (2005): 333–49.
35 Goertz et al., “Can Interim Assessments Be Used for Instructional Change?,” 2009, 5.
36 Ibid.; Daly, “Data, Dyads and Dynamics,” 2012.
37 See the Spencer Foundation’s Data Use and Educational Improvement initiative, http://www.spencer.org/data-use-and-educational-improvement.
38 Amanda Datnow and Vicki Park, Data-Driven Leadership Vol. 12 (San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons, 2014).

Section 2: Does teacher collaboration improve teacher retention, satisfaction or instructional practice?

39 Katrien Vangrieken, Filip Dochy, Elisabeth Raes and Eva Kyndt, “Teacher Collaboration: A Systematic Review,” Educational Research Review 15 (2015): 35.
40 Ibid.
41 Madiha Shah, “The Importance and Benefits of Teacher Collegiality in Schools—A Literature Review,” Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences 46 (2012): 1243.
42 Matthew A. Kraft, William H. Marinell and Darrick Shen-Wei Yee, “School Organizational Contexts, Teacher Turnover, and Student Achievement: Evidence from Panel Data,” American Educational Research Journal 53, no. 5 (2016): 1411–99.
43 Susan Moore Johnson, Matthew A. Kraft and John P. Papay, “How Context Matters in High-Need Schools: The Effects of Teachers’ Working Conditions on Their Professional Satisfaction and Their Students’ Achievement,” Teachers College Record 114, no. 10 (2012): 25.
44 Thomas M. Smith and Richard M. Ingersoll, “What Are the Effects of Induction and Mentoring on Beginning Teacher Turnover?” American Educational Research Journal 41, no. 3 (2004): 682.
45 Ibid., 703.
46 Susan Moore Johnson and the Project on the Next Generation of Teachers, Finders and Keepers: Helping New Teachers Survive and Thrive in Our Schools (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2007).
47 Smith and Ingersoll, “What Are the Effects,” 2004: 702–03, 706.
48 Patti L. Chance and Susan N. Segura, “A Rural High School’s Collaborative Approach to School Improvement,” Journal of Research in Rural Education (Online) 24, no. 5 (2009): 5, http://jrre.vmhost.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/24-5.pdf.
49 Anthony S. Bryk, Penny Bender Sebring, Elaine Allensworth et al., Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 7.
50 Neena Banerjee, Elizabeth Stearns, Stephanie Moller and Roslyn Arlin Mickelson, "Teacher Job Satisfaction and Student Achievement: The Roles of Teacher Professional Community and Teacher Collaboration in Schools," American Journal of Education 123, no. 2 (2017): 213.
51 Ibid., 232.
52 Leigh Mesler Parise and James P. Spillane, "Teacher Learning and Instructional Change: How Formal and On-the-Job Learning Opportunities Predict Change in Elementary School Teachers' Practice," Elementary School Journal 110, no. 3 (2010): 336.
53 European Commission, The Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013: Main Findings from the Survey and Implications for Education and Training Policies in Europe (2013), 22, http://ec.europa.eu/education/library/reports/2014/talis_en.pdf.
54 Bruce Johnson, “Teacher Collaboration: Good for Some, Not So Good for Others,” Educational Studies 29, no. 4 (2003): 343.
55 Brenda Beatty, “From Crayons to Perfume: Getting Beyond Contrived Collegiality,” Journal of Educational Change 12, no. 2 (2011): 259; Ilana Seidel Horn, “Teachers Learning Together: Pedagogical Reasoning in Mathematics Teachers’ Collaborative Conversations,” in Selected Regular Lectures from the 12th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2015), 333–42; Ilana Seidel Horn and Judith Warren Little, “Attending to Problems of Practice: Routines and Resources for Professional Learning in Teachers’ Workplace Interactions,” American Educational Research Journal 47, no. 1 (2010): 192; Johnson, “Teacher Collaboration,” 2003, 342; Johnson et al., Finders and Keepers, 2007.
56 Horn, “Teachers Learning Together,” 2015: 338.
57 Johnson, “Teacher Collaboration,” 2003, 347.
58 Carol Briscoe and Joseph Peters, “Teacher Collaboration Across and Within Schools: Supporting Individual Change in Elementary Science Teaching,” Science Education 81, no. 1 (1997): 59.
59 Ibid.
60 Amanda Datnow, “Collaboration and Contrived Collegiality: Revisiting Hargreaves in the Age of Accountability,” Journal of Educational Change 12, no. 2 (2011): 154, https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10833-011-9154-1.
61 Betty Achinstein, “Conflict Amid Community: The Micropolitics of Teacher Collaboration,” Teachers College Record 104, no. 3 (2002): 426, 444.
62 Pam Grossman, Sam Wineburg and Stephen Woolworth, “Toward a Theory of Teacher Community,” Teachers College Record 103 (2001): 942–1012, http://www.tcrecord.org/Content.asp?ContentID=10833.
63 Johnson et al., Finders and Keepers , 2007; L. Brook E. Sawyer and Sara E. Rimm‐Kaufman, “Teacher Collaboration in the Context of the Responsive Classroom Approach,” Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice 13, no. 3 (2007): 214; Carrie R. Leana and Frits K. Pil, “A New Focus on Social Capital in School Reform Efforts,” Shanker Institute blog, October 14, 2014, http://www.shankerinstitute.org/blog/new-focus-social-capital-school-reform-efforts.
64 Johnson et al., Finders and Keepers, 2007.
65 Roger A. Stewart and Jonathan L. Brendefur, “Fusing Lesson Study and Authentic Achievement: A Model for Teacher Collaboration,” Phi Delta Kappan 86, no. 9 (2005): 686.
66 Thomas H. Levine and Alan S. Marcus, “Closing the Achievement Gap Through Teacher Collaboration: Facilitating Multiple Trajectories of Teacher Learning,” Journal of Advanced Academics 19, no. 1 (2007): 134.
67 Susan J. Rosenholtz, Teachers' Workplace: The Social Organization of Schools (New York: Longman, 1989).
68 Horn and Little, “Attending to Problems of Practice,” 2010, 192.

Section 3: How do teachers collaborate?

69 Katrien Vangrieken, Filip Dochy, Elisabeth Raes and Eva Kyndt, "Teacher Collaboration: A Systematic Review," Educational Research Review 15 (2015): 17–40.
70 Ibid.
71 Ibid., 26–27.
72 Ibid., 24.
73 See, for example: Judith Warren Little, "Norms of Collegiality and Experimentation: Workplace Conditions of School Success," American Educational Research Journal 19, no. 3 (1982): 325–40; Milbrey W. McLaughlin and Joan E. Talbert, Professional Communities and the Work of High School Teaching (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001).
74 See, for example: Ronald Gallimore, Bradley A. Ermeling, William M. Saunders and Claude Goldenberg, “Moving the Learning of Teaching Closer to Practice: Teacher Education Implications of School-Based Inquiry Teams,” Elementary School Journal 109, no. 5 (2009): 543–44; John Papay, Eric S. Taylor, John H. Tyler and Mary Laski, “Learning Job Skills from Colleagues at Work: Evidence from a Field Experiment Using Teacher Performance Data” No. w21986 (Cambridge, Mass.: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2016): 22–25; Jonah E. Rockoff, “Does Mentoring Reduce Turnover and Improve Skills of New Employees? Evidence from Teachers in New York City” No. w13868 (Cambridge, Mass.: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2008): 4; Catherine C. Lewis and Rebecca Reed Perry, "A Randomized Trial of Lesson Study with Mathematical Resource Kits: Analysis of Impact on Teachers’ Beliefs and Learning Community," in James A. Middleton, Jinfa Cai and Stephen Hwang, eds., Large-Scale Studies in Mathematics Education (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2015), 133–58.
75 Susan Moore Johnson, Stefanie K. Reinhorn and Nicole S. Simon, "Ending Isolation: The Payoff of Teacher Teams in Successful High-Poverty Urban Schools,” working paper (Cambridge, Mass.: Project on the Next Generation of Teachers, Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2015).
76 Matthew Ronfeldt, “Better Collaboration, Better Teaching,” in Esther Quintero, ed., Teaching in Context: The Social Side of Educational Reform (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Education Press, 2017), 71.
77 Betty Achinstein, “Conflict Amid Community: The Micropolitics of Teacher Collaboration,” Teachers College Record 104 (2002): 421–55, as cited in Vangrieken et al., “Teacher Collaboration,” 2015, 23.
78 Vicki Vescio, Dorene Ross and Alyson Adams, “A Review of Research on the Impact of Professional Learning Communities on Teaching Practice and Student Learning,” Teaching and Teacher Education 24, no. 1 (2008): 81; Ilana Seidel Horn and Judith Warren Little, “Attending to Problems of Practice: Routines and Resources for Professional Learning in Teachers’ Workplace Interactions,” American Educational Research Journal 47, no. 1 (2010): 183.
79 Anthony S. Bryk, Penny Bender Sebring, Elaine Allensworth et al., Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 56.
80 Ibid., 117.
81 Joel Westheimer, “Learning Among Colleagues: Teacher Community and the Shared Enterprise of Education,” in Marilyn Cochran-Smith, Sharon Feiman-Nemser, D. John McIntyre et al., eds., Handbook of Research on Teacher Education (Reston, Va., and Lanham, Md.: Association of Teacher Educators and Rowman, 2008), 756–82, as cited in Vangrieken et al., “Teacher Collaboration,” 2015, 23.
82 Boston Consulting Group, “Teachers Know Best: Teachers’ Views on Professional Development” (Seattle: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2014), 5, https://s3.amazonaws.com/edtech-production/reports/Gates-PDMarketResearch-Dec5.pdf.
83 Rick DuFour and Douglas Reeves, “Professional Learning Communities Still Work (If Done Right),” First Person (blog), Education Week Teacher, October 2, 2015, http://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2015/10/02/professional-learning-communities-still-work-if-done.html?r=1195158129.
84 Vescio et al., “A Review of Research,” 88.
85 William M. Saunders, Claude N. Goldenberg and Ronald Gallimore, “Increasing Achievement by Focusing Grade-Level Teams on Improving Classroom Learning: A Prospective, Quasi-Experimental Study of Title I Schools,” American Educational Research Journal 46, no. 4 (2009): 1010.
86 Ibid., 1019.
87 Ibid., 1006.
88 Susan Moore Johnson and the Project on the Next Generation of Teachers. Finders and Keepers: Helping New Teachers Survive and Thrive in Our Schools (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2007): 139-66, 225-48.
89 Ibid.
90 Steven Glazerman, Eric Isenberg, Sarah Dolphin et al., "Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Final Results from a Randomized Controlled Study,” NCEE 2010-4027 (Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2010), xxiii–xxv, https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20104027/.
91 Ibid.
92 Papay et al., “Learning Job Skills from Colleagues at Work,” 2016, 22.
93 Ibid., 24.
94 Ibid.
95 Thomas M. Smith and Richard M. Ingersoll, “What Are the Effects of Induction and Mentoring on Beginning Teacher Turnover?” American Educational Research Journal 41, no. 3 (2004): 705–06.
96 Ibid.
97 Rockoff, “Does Mentoring Reduce Turnover and Improve Skills of New Employees?” 2008.
98 Ibid., 30–31.
99 Nathan Driskell, “Global Perspectives: Mentoring and Support for New Teachers in Ontario and Finland,” Top of the Class Newsletter (blog), National Center on Education and the Economy, September 28, 2015, http://ncee.org/2015/09/global-perspectives-mentoring-and-support-for-new-teachers-in-ontario-and-finland/.
100 Mohammad Reza Sarkar Arani, Keisuke Fukaya and James P. Lassegard, "‘Lesson Study’ as Professional Culture in Japanese Schools: An Historical Perspective on Elementary Classroom Practices," Nichibunken Japan Review (2010): 171–200.
101 Rebecca R. Perry and Catherine C. Lewis, "What Is Successful Adaptation of Lesson Study in the US?" Journal of Educational Change 10, no. 4 (2009): 365–91.
102 James W. Stigler and James Hiebert, The Teaching Gap: Best Ideas from the World’s Teachers for Improving Education in the Classroom (New York: Summit Books, 1999).
103 Arani et al., “Lesson Study” 2010; Catherine Lewis, Rebecca Perry and Aki Murata, "How Should Research Contribute to Instructional Improvement? The Case of Lesson Study," Educational Researcher 35, no. 3 (2006): 3–14; Roger A. Stewart and Jonathan L. Brendefur, "Fusing Lesson Study and Authentic Achievement: A Model for Teacher Collaboration," Phi Delta Kappan 86, no. 9 (2005): 681.
104 Carol K. Chan and Ming Fai Pang, “Teacher Collaboration in Learning Communities,” Teaching Education 17, no. 1 (2006): 3.
105 Lynn C. Hart, Alice Alston and Aki Murata, eds., Lesson Study Research and Practice in Mathematics Education (Neth.: Springer, 2011).
106 Ibid., 10.
107 Perry and Lewis, "What Is Successful Adaptation of Lesson Study in the US?” 2009, 365–91.
108 Lewis et al., “How Should Research Contribute to Instructional Improvement?,” 2006.
109 Ibid., 151.
110 Lewis and Perry, "A Randomized Trial of Lesson Study with Mathematical Resource Kits,” 2015, 133–58.
111 Leigh Mesler Parise and James P. Spillane, "Teacher Learning and Instructional Change: How Formal and On-the-Job Learning Opportunities Predict Change in Elementary School Teachers' Practice," Elementary School Journal 110, no. 3 (2010): 323–46.
112 Ibid., 325.
113 Laura M Desimone, "Improving Impact Studies of Teachers’ Professional Development: Toward Better Conceptualizations and Measures," Educational Researcher 38, no. 3 (2009): 183–84.
114 Elham Kazemi and Megan Loef Franke, “Teacher Learning in Mathematics: Using Student Work to Promote Collective Inquiry,” Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education 7 (2004): 203–35.
115 Bryk et al., Organizing Schools for Improvement, 2010, 73.
116 Andy Hargreaves and Ruth Dawe, “Paths of Professional Development: Contrived Collegiality, Collaborative Culture, and the Case of Peer Coaching,” Teaching and Teacher Education 6, no. 3 (1990): 227–41; Ilana Seidel Horn, “Teachers Learning Together: Pedagogical Reasoning in Mathematics Teachers’ Collaborative Conversations,” in Selected Regular Lectures from the 12th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Springer International Publishing, 2015), 333–42; Johnson et al., Finders and Keepers, 2007.
117 Vangrieken et al., “Teacher Collaboration,” 2015, 29–33.
118 Gallimore et al., “Moving the Learning of Teaching Closer to Practice,” 543.
119 Ibid., 543–44.
120 Ibid.
121 Madiha Shah, “The Importance and Benefits of Teacher Collegiality in Schools—A Literature Review,” Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences 46 (2012): 1242.
122 Michael Fullan and Andy Hargreaves, What's Worth Fighting for in Your School? Rev. ed. New York: Teachers College Press, 1996; Jennifer Nias, "Refining the ‘Cultural Perspective,’" Cambridge Journal of Education 19, no. 2 (1989): 143–46; Susan J. Rosenholtz, "Effective Schools: Interpreting the Evidence," American Journal of Education 93, no. 3 (1985): 352–88; Susan J. Rosenholtz, "Workplace Conditions That Affect Teacher Quality and Commitment: Implications for Teacher Induction Programs," Elementary School Journal 89, no. 4 (1989): 421–39; Linda Darling-Hammond and Milbrey W. McLaughlin, "Policies That Support Professional Development in an Era of Reform," Phi Delta Kappan 92, no. 6 (2011): 81–92 [all the preceding cited in L. Brook E. Sawyer and Sara E. Rimm‐Kaufman, “Teacher Collaboration in the Context of the Responsive Classroom Approach,” Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice 13, no. 3 (2007): 215]; Ronald Gallimore, Bradley A. Ermeling, William M. Saunders and Claude Goldenberg, “Moving the Learning of Teaching Closer to Practice: Teacher Education Implications of School-Based Inquiry Teams,” Elementary School Journal 109, no. 5 (2009): 540.
123 Vangrieken et al., “Teacher Collaboration,” 2015, 33, 35.

Section 4: What are some ways in which principals can foster teacher collaboration?

124 Rebecca Gajda and Christopher J. Koliba, “Evaluating and Improving the Quality of Teacher Collaboration: A Field-Tested Framework for Secondary School Leaders,” NASSP Bulletin 92, no. 2 (2008): 133–53.
125 Anthony S. Bryk, Penny Bender Sebring, Elaine Allensworth et al., Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 28.
126 Ibid.
127 Anthony S. Bryk, Eric Camburn and Karen Seashore Louis, “Professional Community in Chicago Elementary Schools: Facilitating Factors and Organizational Consequences,” Educational Administration Quarterly 35, no. 5 (1999): 757.
128 Ibid., 768.
129 L. Brook E. Sawyer and Sara E. Rimm‐Kaufman, “Teacher Collaboration in the Context of the Responsive Classroom Approach,” Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice 13, no. 3 (2007): 228.
130 Joseph Blase and Jo Blase, “Principals’ Instructional Leadership and Teacher Development: Teachers’ Perspectives,” Educational Administration Quarterly 35, no. 3 (1999): 364.
131 David Piercey, “Why Don’t Teachers Collaborate? A Leadership Conundrum,” Phi Delta Kappan 92, no. 1 (2010): 5.
132 Ibid., 3, 5.
133 Jo Blase and Joseph Blase, “Implementation of Shared Governance for Instructional Improvement: Principals' Perspectives,” Journal of Educational Administration 37, no. 5 (1999): 496.
134 Bryk et al., “Professional Community in Chicago Elementary Schools,” 1999, 757.
135 Richard DuFour, “In the Right Context,” Journal of Staff Development 22, no. 1 (2001): 15; Hanna Shachar and Haddas Shmuelevitz, “Implementing Cooperative Learning, Teacher Collaboration and Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy in Heterogeneous Junior High Schools,” Contemporary Educational Psychology 22, no. 1 (1997): 58; Bryk et al., Organizing Schools for Improvement, 2010, 26; Matthew A. Kraft and John P. Papay, “Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience,” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 36, no. 4 (2014): 478.
136 Susan Moore Johnson, "Will VAMs Reinforce the Walls of the Egg-Crate School?" Educational Researcher 44, no. 2 (2015): 123.
137 John P. Papay and Matthew A. Kraft, "Developing Workplaces Where Teachers Stay, Improve, and Succeed," Shanker Institute blog, May 28, 2015, http://www.shankerinstitute.org/blog/developing-workplaces-where-teachers-stay-improve-and-succeed.
138 Jean Johnson, You Can't Do It Alone: A Communications and Engagement Manual for School Leaders Committed to Reform (Lanham, Md.: R&L Education, 2012); Thomas M. Smith and Richard M. Ingersoll, “What Are the Effects of Induction and Mentoring on Beginning Teacher Turnover?,” American Educational Research Journal 41, no. 3 (2004): 705–06; Kraft and Papay, “Professional Environments,” 2014, 478.
139 Blase and Blase, “Principals’ Instructional Leadership,” 1999, 359.
140 Roger Goddard, Yvonne Goddard, Eun Sook Kim and Robert Miller, “A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of the Roles of Instructional Leadership, Teacher Collaboration, and Collective Efficacy Beliefs in Support of Student Learning,” American Journal of Education 121, no. 4 (2015): 501–30, http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yvonne+goddard&id=EJ1102657.
141 Cynthia E. Coburn and Jennifer Lin Russell, “District Policy and Teachers’ Social Networks,” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 30, no. 3 (2008): 203–35; Paul Cobb and Kay McClain, “The Collective Mediation of a High-Stakes Accountability Program: Communities and Networks of Practice,” Mind, Culture, and Activity 13 (2006): 80–100.
142 Nicole Louie and Na’ilah Suad Nasir, “Derailed at Railside,” in Na’ilah Suad Nasir, Carlos Cabana, Barbara Shreve et al., eds., Mathematics for Equity: A Framework for Successful Practice (New York: Teachers College Press, 2014): 187–207.
143 Ibid., 198.
144 Ibid., 192.
145 Amanda Datnow, “Collaboration and Contrived Collegiality: Revisiting Hargreaves in the Age of Accountability,” Journal of Educational Change 12, no. 2 (2011): 148.
146 Andy Hargreaves, “The Emotional Geographies of Teachers’ Relations with Colleagues,” International Journal of Educational Research 35, no. 5 (2001): 503–04.
147 Sawyer and Rimm‐Kaufman, “Teacher Collaboration in the Context of the Responsive Classroom Approach,” 2007, 230, 238.
148 Ibid., 238–39.
149 Datnow, “Collaboration and Contrived Collegiality,” 2011, 156.

Section 5: How do schools make time for teachers to collaborate?

150 Mary Anne Raywid, “Finding Time for Collaboration,” Educational Leadership 51 (1993): 30; U.S. Department of Education, “Great Teachers and Great Leaders” (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 2010), accessed February 11, 2016, http://ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/blueprint/great-teachers-great-leaders.pdf, 3, 7; Richard DuFour, “What Is a ‘Professional Learning Community’?” Educational Leadership 61, no. 8 (2004): 4, 5; Matthew A. Kraft, John P. Papay, Megin Charner-Laird et al., “Educating Amidst Uncertainty: The Organizational Supports Teachers Need to Serve Students in High-Poverty, Urban Schools,” Educational Administration Quarterly 51, no. 5 (2015): 767, 784.
151 David Piercey, “Why Don’t Teachers Collaborate? A Leadership Conundrum,” Phi Delta Kappan 92, no. 1 (2010): 4; L. Brook E. Sawyer and Sara E. Rimm‐Kaufman, “Teacher Collaboration in the Context of the Responsive Classroom Approach,” Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice 13, no. 3 (2007): 228.
152 Helen F. Ladd, “Teachers’ Perceptions of Their Working Conditions: How Predictive of Policy-Relevant Outcomes?” Working Paper 33 (Washington, DC: National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research, 2009), cited in Matthew A. Kraft and John P. Papay, “Can Professional Environments in Schools Promote Teacher Development? Explaining Heterogeneity in Returns to Teaching Experience,” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 36, no. 4 (2014): 478.
153 Thomas M. Smith and Richard M. Ingersoll, “What Are the Effects of Induction and Mentoring on Beginning Teacher Turnover?” American Educational Research Journal 41, no. 3 (2004): 703, 706.
154 Joseph Blase and Jo Blase, “Principals’ Instructional Leadership and Teacher Development: Teachers’ Perspectives,” Educational Administration Quarterly 35, no. 3 (1999): 364; Anthony S. Bryk, Eric Camburn, and Karen Seashore Louis, “Professional Community in Chicago Elementary Schools: Facilitating Factors and Organizational Consequences,” Educational Administration Quarterly 35, no. 5 (1999): 757; Hanna Shachar and Haddas Shmuelevitz, “Implementing Cooperative Learning, Teacher Collaboration and Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy in Heterogeneous Junior High Schools,” Contemporary Educational Psychology 22, no. 1 (1997): 58; Richard DuFour, “In the Right Context,” Journal of Staff Development 22, no. 1 (2001): 15.
155 Patti L. Chance and Susan N. Segura, “A Rural High School’s Collaborative Approach to School Improvement,” Journal of Research in Rural Education (Online) 24, no. 5 (2009): 1, http://jrre.vmhost.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/24-5.pdf.
156 Raywid, “Finding Time for Collaboration,” 1993, 32.
157 Ibid., 31.
158 Amanda Datnow, “Collaboration and Contrived Collegiality: Revisiting Hargreaves in the Age of Accountability,” Journal of Educational Change 12, no. 2 (2011): 152; Thomas H. Levine and Alan S. Marcus, “Closing the Achievement Gap Through Teacher Collaboration: Facilitating Multiple Trajectories of Teacher Learning,” Journal of Advanced Academics 19, no. 1 (2007): 126.
159 Datnow, “Collaboration and Contrived Collegiality,” 2011, 152.
160 Ibid.
161 Kraft et al., “Educating Amidst Uncertainty,” 2015, 15; Joseph Vincente, “Collaboration Is the Way We Work, Not an 'Activity,’” Shanker Institute blog, March 29, 2016, http://www.shankerinstitute.org/blog/vincente.
162 William M. Saunders, Claude N. Goldenberg and Ronald Gallimore, “Increasing Achievement by Focusing Grade-Level Teams on Improving Classroom Learning: A Prospective, Quasi-Experimental Study of Title I Schools,” American Educational Research Journal 46, no. 4 (2009): 1010, 1019, 1026, 1028.




We want to hear from you! STAY CONNECTED